Chasing Waterfalls: Casaroro and Pulangbato

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Hello readers. It’s been a while; 2016’s come and gone (thank God) and I’m back with a vengeance.

I survived the Christmas break, and I managed to squeeze some travel plans in between the parties and the ditzy soirees.

Yesterday I visited Valencia for the first time. Valencia’s a small town, a short 20 minutes’ ride from Dumaguete. And it has two of the most amazing waterfalls I’ve seen, namely Casaroro and Pulangbato (literally Red Rock)

Getting to Casaroro was a bit of a challenge. You have to go down a steep flight of stairs. We had to traverse some rocks and streams (and we had to deal with some pretty strong currents too) to get there, but boy was it magical.

Pulangbato was smaller in comparison, but it was just as serene.

Here are some photos from the trek.

Continue reading “Chasing Waterfalls: Casaroro and Pulangbato”

The Market, Part 2

Dumaguete public market, dumaguete city, philippines

Here’s part 2. Going back to June’s theme of colors and not-quite-abandoned places/things. I hope you enjoy. I’d love to know what you think of my photos! Thanks!

Continue reading “The Market, Part 2”

Give Me Shelter

poor man, homeless man, homeless people, depression, sadness

“Give Me Shelter”. Carriedo, Manila. May 18, 2016. Photography by Teegee Villanueva

I was overcome with a deep and profound sadness this afternoon. I felt dead; I came undone and it obviously affected my output. I was editing images when the thoughts came on, and I was ruminating non-stop. I went silent for two hours. I ignored everyone who tried to speak to me. And after an hour or two, I felt better; relieved, at the moment, from the demons who perpetually torment me.

I tell you this with absolutely certainty: this illness will kill me one day. I don’t know when…maybe tomorrow, maybe in the next two years. Who can say.

On the photo: while walking around Binondo, I ran into a man washing his clothes (and himself) at the Carriedo fountain. It was dirty and the water was polluted. He noticed me, and when he did he carried on as if I weren’t even there. It was a sad sight and I thought it was reflective of the Filipino experience–at least for those living in the margins. It’s not an easy life for most Filipinos; most people live on subsistence wages or very low salaries here, and life becomes a burden…when it shouldn’t even be.